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Tips to Improve your English Speaking

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Here are Some Simple tips to Improve Your English Speaking: 1) Of course, the best way is to immerse yourself in a native speaking environment and engage in as many interactions as you can. Shyness shouldn't be an excuse, and keep in mind that the more you speak the less shy you'll feel as you becomeaccustomed to speaking. 2) Listen to a variety of English programs and English accents. This will train your listening skills and you will also learn different English expressions. Better yet if you can record these programs, play them back, listen and take notes. Then, you can practice saying these expressions. 3) Also record your own speaking voice. In this way, you'll get a much better idea about how you speak. Is your speaking pace natural sounding, or too slow or too fast and if your pronunciation is clear, your grammar is accurate and your vocabulary is appropriate or if you need to work on any or all of these. 4) Speaking of pronunciation, reading out loud is a very good…
Figurative language is speech or writing that departs from normal meaning or sound to

create a special effect. These "literary devices" as they are called are: alliteration, hyperbole, idioms,

metaphors, personification, onomatopoeia and similes. Last month, we tackled the first device

"alliteration." Here we're going to discuss the fun device "hyperbole."


The meaning of hyperbole is a gross exaggeration, in order to emphasize a point. And we use it in

both everyday speech and when writing.

Here are some examples:

1) My dad can lift two tons (i.e. he is a very strong person). You should have the idea from here.

2) That food was so hot my ears were smoking.

3) That boy runs faster than a car.

4) I'm so tired I could sleep a year.

5) I'm 20 feet tall this month.

6) I must have walked a thousand miles.

7) He cried so long that he made a lake.

8) I'm so hungry I could eat a horse.

9) You have a million toys at your house.



Stay connected for th…
TESOL International (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages), based in Alexandria,


Virginia, USA, will end its electoral process on Monday, Nov. 5th, 2018. Members in every area of


the globe voted for its new President, Board of Directors and Nominating Committee. This is the


world's largest professional organization for both teachers of English as a Second Language (ESL)



and English as a Foreign Language (EFL): www.tesol.org

What is Figurative Language?

Figurative language is speech or writing that departs from normal meaning or sound to create a

create a special effect. These "literary devices" as they are called are: alliteration, hyperbole, idioms,

metaphors, personification, onomatopoeia and similies.



In this post, we'll cover the first device, "Alliteration." It is the repetition of a sound in a sentence or

in a series of sentences.

An example is: Samantha soared down the street on her sleek skateboard. Here the repetition is of

the sound of the letter 'S.'


*Stay tuned for tomorrow's definition and example of 'hyperbole.'


www.englishteachinghoboken.com


The comma

The comma is a much misused and often over used piece of punctuation. The complexity of its usage stems primarily from the fact that there are several different situations in which the comma is the correct piece of punctuation to use. The trick is to identify those situations so as not to use the comma in places where it really should not be.

The following are some of the situations in which a comma should be used:

1. To separate the elements in a list of three or more items.
E.G: The potion included gobstoppers, chewing gum, bran flakes and coleslaw.
There appears to be some debate about whether or not to include a comma to separate the last two items in the series. Personally I was taught to omit the comma before the final 'and' unless there is a danger that the last two items in the series will merge and become indistinguishable without the comma.

His favourite puddings were ice apple pie, rhubarb crumble…

Reading Strategies!

PREDICT: Try to figure out what might happen next.




VISUALIZE: Picture the people, places and events being described.




CONNECT: Connect what you are reading to other texts and the real world.




QUESTION: (Self-Questioning): Ask questions about the material you are reading. This is crucial

for the continuous development of ideas.




CLARIFY: Investigate and Identify the main points and summarize.




EVALUATE: Judge the story and the actions of characters. This is also important to develop your

creativity and opinions.